CHRIST THE KING WITH PHOTOFADE
BAR
IRRATIONALITY: THE HOBBY LOBBY CASE
AND THE LEGAL PUNDITS

BAR

by Pauly Fongemie
March 25, 2014
Feast of the Annunciation

This column is going to press before we know the outcome of the US Supreme Court decision in the Hobby Lobby case. For those who are not familiar with the issue at stake: Hobby Lobby, a corporation with more than 50 full-time employees does not want to pay for the Obamacare requirement to provide contraception, abortion and euthanasia coverage of employees.

Various legal experts have been weighing in since last week. One of the better well-known legal pundits is for Hobby Lobby to prevail because of the right to conscience of even corporations that are owned by individuals with religious rights.

So far so good. Then he took a hundred and eighty degree turn the opposite way, exposing both his hypocrisy and that of Hobby Lobby. To wit: Hobby Lobby and the pundit agree that the federal government could fund the coverage of abortion, contraception and euthanasia. But the federal government is funded by the taxpayers, which includes Hobby Lobby, as a corporation and as individual owners who pay income taxes. In other words, the pundit, a former judge, thinks that Hobby Lobby ought not be forced to pay for the coverage, but its owners as individuals can be coerced to. This is simply irrational!

If it is unjust and unconstitutional to coerce companies, is it not equally unconstitituational for individuals?!!

By declaring that individual taxpayers can be compelled to underwrite these mortal sins that violate the natural law, the judge is in effect saying you and I no longer have the same rights as Hobby Lobby, should the Court find in their favor!

When we cede the precious duty to circumvent and even deny the binding necessity of the natural law, we easily lose our way all the way to such absurdities!
BACKE-MAILNEXT

HOME ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- DIRECTORIES

www.catholictradition.org/irrationality.htm